Fantastic Fun Ferd The Whole Family!

Ferdinand

 

In the shadow of the epic saga, there lies an animated field where flowers grow, birds sing, and bulls romp around smelling the fauna.  No, I’m not drunk, I’m talking about Ferdinand the Bull, the latest kid’s animated feature to stamped on to the silver screen. Blue Skies Studio has been advertising this film like crazy, in hopes of nabbing the younger audience this weekend.  Yet with Disney knocking these films out of the park is there any hope for the other studios to put out quality work?  Robbie K here happy to answer that question, as we hit yet another Robbie’s movie review.

 

 

LIKES:

 

Animation: It’s an animated movie and as such you want the animation to be well good.  While not the most realistic looking film to drop into our laps, Ferdinand still has a wonderful style that brings the world to life.  The cartoony looks of the character, a common theme in Blue Sky production, adds to the fun of the film, and will be a welcoming sight to your little ones.  The world has dynamic shades of color to mirror the tone of the setting, and a majority of it explodes to life in a manner that kid’s movies only can. And of course… the anthropomorphized animals move beautifully in all aspects from the simple act of speaking to even break dancing. 

 

Voice work:  In an animated work, it’s up to the voice work to also bring the characters to life and Ferdinand accomplishes this goal quite well.  John Cena is surprisingly a great voice actor, bringing some range in his emotional spectrum I didn’t quite expect from the gigantic tower of a man. Kate McKinnon in all her glory, is the comedic punch to the film with a very energetic delivery that gets toned down a few times to roll her character back in serious mode.  Of course the other supporting voices lend their roles well with Anthony Anderson, Peyton Manning, Gina Rodriguez, and Gabriel Iglesias all contributing to the fun at hand in their own special way, and yes fluffy was my favorite. And as an added bonus, most of the characters have decent screen time, meaning you don’t get shortsighted like many films do.

 

The Fun:  This movie is exactly what the advertisements promise, a fun, simplistic adventure that brings a lot of enjoyment to the screen.  Ferdinand’s antics are simply cute, like a big puppy trapped in a big body that is awkward and klutzy. What starts as simplistic slapstick though soon evolves, recruiting some rather witty jokes, a poke at some cinema references, and a dance off that will be legendary on YouTube for some time.  All these little gestures combine to maximize the laughs, and while much of this is geared towards kids, there are some jokes that adults will appreciate.

 

The emotions:  While this movie is certainly more on the humorous side, it’s also got a great delivery to tug at the heart strings.  Ferdinand’s moral code is inspiring, his perspective of love, loyalty, friendship, and courage fantastically told in the camera work and cinematic score.  I didn’t tear up, but the things the digital bull did carved a smile on my face for a majority of the movie.  It’s nice to see such balance in the film.

 

DISLIKES:

 

A little too simplistic:  One thing that is difficult to compete with Disney is their unique worlds and ideas they build.  Ferdinand, despite being fun, is not that unique of an environment compared to the magic of Walt and is lacking that creative spark that has become famous in modern animation.  In addition, the movie doesn’t have the most complicated twists to the mix, which works for the younger audience, but could have added a little more pep to the step.

 

McKinnon’s jokes:  While McKinnon is a fantastic voice actor and infuses energy into the mix, there are times where she goes a little too far in her joking.  The writer’s capitalized on her SNL talents, but sadly they went a little too far.  Kate’s character Lupe is very sporadic, extremely silly, and at times very irritating.  Imagine a drunk toddler with an ADD twist, and you’ll get a good idea of what her character is like, including regurgitation and memory lapse for the whole family.  Yes, there are those golden moments where it works, but for me, well Lupe’s over trying was a downfall for me in the long run.  Thank goodness for those grounding moments, because without them… well I wouldn’t have been pulling for them.

 

More hedgehogs:  Final small dislike, wanted more hedgehog power to bring up the magic.  They were my favorite characters of the bunch, and I would have liked to see them shine a little more.

 

The VERDICT:

 

            Ferdinand is fun, wholesome, family entertainment that will leave you with a warm feeling in your heart and a smile on your face.  With great animation and voice work to guide the way, this movie will be a fantastic trip for you and the whole family. Despite the fun to be had though, it still needs some tweaking in a few areas to really bring out the masterpiece.  In comparison to a Disney film, it has a lot of work to catch up on, but most families should not mind with the fun adventure to be had.  Worth a trip to the theater?  Yeah, I can say it would be, especially for a nice holiday church outing. 

 

My scores:

 

Animation/Adventure/Comedy:  8.0

Movie Overall  6.5-7.0

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BaHumbug!

Invented Christmas

 

Christmas gets started way too early for me most years, but nevertheless the holiday themed movies are happy to take to the masses in hopes of getting the spirit going.  Yet the definition of the modern Christmas we celebrate can be traced to legendary author Charles Dickens who made the timeless classic A Christmas Carol.  Such an epic story is stemmed in the spirit of giving, hope, and redemption, a symbol that we aspire to hit and often not succeed.  Where did the inspiration come from though? How did he get the ideas?  I don’t know, but the movie I’m reviewing tonight attempts to answer that question in an entertaining manner.  Robbie K here sharing his opinions on The Man Who Invented Christmas starring Dan Stevens and Christopher Plummer.

 

LIKES:

 

The World:  If you read my reviews, you know I’m a big fan of world building and settings.  The Man Who Invented Christmas recreates the nostalgic world of 19th century London and all the class that once inhabited the world.  Seeing the society of the times reemerge from the London fog brought a homey feeling to me, invoking the beginnings of the Christmas season in a world that once treated as a minor holiday.  The attention to detail is astonishing, primarily in all the chaotic organization that was Dickens’ life, primarily the study to where he pondered all his works.  It is this factor that will pull you into the movie as the stage continues to unfold.

 

Clever Presentation:  When attempting to answer how Charles got his motivation and do it in an entertaining manner, the team has to think outside the box for this one. The Man Who Invented Christmas managed to do this quite well in most manners, primarily in rendering his thoughts as personified beings, capable of interacting with him.  His conversations with the characters is a creative representation of the stresses of his mind and how they influence the progression of the story.  And very much like a scene out of Slum Dog Millionaire, the movie was able to also bring his supposed history into the mix to also motivate moments of the book.  Much of it was predictable, but it was a nice homage to his life that filled in the gaps I had forgotten.

 

The Acting:  By far the best element for me though is the acting held in this movie.  The secondary characters do their part in serving as obstacles, motivations, and support for Dickens himself, especially his best friend and his father.  Yet, the main piece to watch are the characters of Scrooge and Dickens himself.  Christopher Plummer still has life within his older bones, playing the pompous Englishman to the letter.  He captured all the quips, jabs, and sarcasm of the character and managed to get that bitter attitude toward life.  Yet, Plummer also got the humorous part of the role down pat, almost like a rival/mentor showing tough love to accomplish the task. As for Stevens, his portrayal of the talented writer with the obsession for perfection was fantastic.  Stevens managed to take the dual role of Charles Dickens and personify the internal struggle that was his life as he pursued his muse of an epic story. All the anger, frustration, and joy were quite balanced in this movie, hooking me into his life and keeping me in my seat until the final sequence faded to black.

 

DISLIKES:

Scene Placement:  The movie does a nice job filling in the gaps, but at times I didn’t enjoy the placement of the scenes.  Mainly the flashback scenes, much of Dickens’ past was scattered through this movie, dropped at odd moments that offset the momentum of the sequence. Some of these moments could have been better delivered at earlier moments, and may have minimized the confusion of why he was so angry.  Not sure whose direction it was to place things in this order, but it didn’t work for me at times.

 

Background Characters:  As you watch his story progress, you get to see new characters emerge as his world starts to motivate him to write.  Yet unlike Scrooge, with whom he constantly interacts with, many of the other characters are just background bodies who smile, laugh, and kind of look odd.  Sure, I understand the personification of what they mean during his writer’s block and how they were connected to his central character, but why did they remain constantly in the background?  I don’t have those answers, but it was kind of odd having them randomly walking around with him and doing little past that.  Sorry guys, not a fan of limited use characters.

 

The diluted emotion:  I expected the movie about the guy who revolutionized Christmas to be a little more emotionally charged.  Sadly, this film didn’t quite pack the holiday joy and magic that his tale was able to elicit long ago when I watched the Muppet version long ago. While inspirational, I didn’t get overwhelmed with feelings that made me embrace the holiday season.  I felt this was due to some of the movie magic being left out of the movie, giving it that realistic twist, but unfortunately drying up the specialness those hokey, overdramatic effects bring to the table.  This tale would have benefitted from a page in the Hallmark channel book in terms of motivating you to inherit the spirit of Christmas.

 

The VERDICT:

 

The Man Who Invented Christmas is an immersive film that uses setting, presentation, and incredible acting to bring the 19th century to life.  Despite all the cool insights into Dickens’ life though, this movie lacks cinematic magic, logical use of characters, and pacing that is important in films.  This movie could have done well on a television release, or streaming movie rather than a theater presentation.  It does hold potential for a church outing, but this reviewer recommends holding out until it comes to home viewing.

 

My scores are:

 

Biography/Comedy/Drama:  8.0

Movie Overall: 7.0

Coco will have you scream Ayeeee yeeeeee Yi Haha! Powerful Music To Bring To Live Culture

Coco

 

Thanksgiving, the holiday of turkey, football, preparation for materialistic shopping, and…Disney.  If you are an avid movie goer, you know the mega corporation is all about capitalizing on the holiday with one of their famous animation movies.  This year is no different, with Walt Disney Animation Studios taking a step back and allowing Pixar to come in with another big hit to sweep best picture category at the Oscars.  Tonight, yours truly hits the theater to scope out Coco, the Hispanic story of music, family, and the dead.  Robbie K here with another review, let us get started.

 

LIKES:

 

The Animation:  Pixar/Disney are the kings of animation, and they have proven themselves again in this CGI masterpiece. Coco’s characters are dynamic, presented in so many forms that give the family a spectrum of characters.  Despite a majority of the cast looking carbon copied version of skeletons, Pixar managed to inject subtle differences to make primary and secondary characters stand out.  The living members also got the anatomy altered as well, going so far to represent all stage of life (i.e. old and senile, young and energetic, and even pregnant).  Past designs, the movement itself is incredibly detailed. The subtle gestures in walking/running, the accurate capture of facial gestures for conversation, and more importantly the incredible finger motions of Miguel and cast playing the guitar.  A statement of Pixar having incredible attention to detail wasn’t kidding, because this thing was gorgeous.

 

Spirit animals:  One stand out feature of this movie are the cool spirt animals that inhabit the land of the undead.  The flying jaguar, while one of the most outstanding displays, is only the tip of the iceberg, and these creatures are sprawled out in the world.  I found it cool to see the creativity of blending common animals into a piñata like creation, each feature designed to add finesse and flare to mix and represent the culture of Mexico.

 

The Culture: Disney movies always have a way of capturing an element of the real world.  Coco’s theme is all about the Mexican culture and the various customs that we as viewers only have an inkling of understanding.  Pixar managed to bring that culture to life not only in design, but in the story, they have developed in this tale. Their belief in the afterlife is the foundation this tale is built on, allowing other things like soap operas, fiestas, food, and the western film culture.  And within all these elements are the important customs of family, the passion of music, and the pursuit of dreams through hard work All of these are beautifully integrated into the mix, occasionally crossing into cheesy territory, to craft a very stirring tale. 

 

The Music: By far the biggest element for me though, has to be the music of Coco.  Disney is always spectacular with their soundtracks, but Coco stands out to me as one of the more unique sets of music to come out of the studio.  Instead of grandiose symphonies, or Oscar designed symphonies, Coco’s music is all about representing the musical culture of Mexico.  Each song builds around the acoustic guitar as the primary instrument in its calm, yet vibrant strings.  Such a simple instrument packs an emotional kick, especially once the supporting instruments and the voice bellow out to unleash the pent-up emotion of our characters.  The songs build into the story, and are used as the primary tools for accomplishing Miguel’s goals and represents a variety of artistic styles this culture has.  It’s dynamic, it’s fun, and its relevant to the story, all big points in this reviewer’s eyes.

 

DISLIKES:

 

The opening short: While separate, the opening number is still part of the show. Olaf’s frozen adventure, while cute, was just another compilation of short songs to refresh Disney’s cash cow for the last few years.  Sure, some of the songs are powerful (the ending in particular), and the message tugs at my strings, but it lacked a lot of sustenance for just more songs.  Thank goodness Coco’s music redeemed this quality.

 

More with the creatures:  I like the spirit animals, I just didn’t like how much of a background they were.  With such cool concepts, you think that Disney would have found a way to capitalize on these monsters’ involvement in the world whether it be searching for clues, chasing our heroes, or having more bang in the final setting.  Even without their integration, the studio downplayed their powers a bit, showing inconsistencies with the potential they developed in these creatures.

 

Lackluster Excitement:  Thinking back to Pixar’s previous works, there are usually those edge on the seat moments that have you questioning the fate of the heroes (Toy Story, Incredibles, even Cars).  Coco not so much for me.  The movie stays pretty safe, with predictable antics, calm action scenes, and a final obstacle that didn’t do much for me in the suspense role. There seemed to be little hindrance to our character’s journey, and in many cases that hindered the development we could have seen.  This film blows the cultural relevance out of the water, yet it still missed its potential for a complete package without the action.

 

Many Book of Life elements:  This movie stands out on its own in so many concepts and the songs are much more original.  Yet, there is a lot of this movie based off of Book of Life, and in many cases less vibrant and unique than the predecessorIn my opinion, I felt the Book of Life was the more exciting of the two tales and I like this design more than the scale this one took.  Still, Coco holds a lot of finesse that the Book failed to have.

 

The VERDICT:

 

Coco is certainly one of the more culturally relevant Pixar movies to come out of the studio.  It’s design and animation are gorgeous, the creativity is on point, and so much of it is packed with tasteful portrayals of this beautiful culture.  Yet, it still has a few shortcomings for me to make it a perfect movie.  They dropped some of the potential they built up and the excitement element could have been amped up with more struggles as well.  When all is said and done though, Coco is by far one of the better films to hit the theaters this November and I strongly encourage many to flood the theaters and scope it out.  And for those with little ones obsessed with Frozen, this movie is only going to be better for them.

 

My scores:

Animation/Adventure/Comedy:  9.0

Movie Overall: 8.5

The Message and Family Fun Shine Bright! Yet Would Have Been Better Direct Release

The Star

 

The spirit of Christmas a common theme of movie around this time of year trying to teach us the main reason we get a vacation and give gifts in December.  And about every five years, we get the retelling of the first Christmas that brought with it hope, grace, and salvation from how horrible of people we are.  This weekend that retelling comes through again, but this time from the perspective of the animals and what they went through that fateful night.  Robbie K here with a review on the Star, an animated movie that hopes to shine bright in this weekend of big releases.  What’s in store?  Read on to find out my friends!

 

LIKES:

Good animation:  With the age of computers, you expect fluid animation, and the Star doesn’t disappoint.  The animal movements are excellent examples of anatomical study, capturing the foot, neck, muzzle, or whatever other body part you want your animal to move in an accurate manner.  In addition, the designers do a nice job of anthropomorphizing the animals as well, creating a hybrid of personalities that are fun to watch.  And while your either admiring, or ignoring the animation, you can be sure that your little one will be stoked to see the characters clumsy antics and slapstick humor result in a laughable adventure with fluid details.

 

The Voice Acting:  While acting in full form is a highly challenging task to try to accomplish, there is something to be said about the art of voice acting.  The assembled cast gets two thumbs up for me in their ability to bring the simplistic animal roles to life with semi-memorable characters.  There are too many characters to name, but Steven Yeun as the main character carried a heavy load as the adventurous, yet stubborn donkey Bo who was a fun character to watch.  Keegan-Michael Key was another welcome addition to the cast, his solid comedic delivery perfect for the comical character of Dave the Dove whose quips have been diluted down for the kid friendly atmosphere of this movie.  However, my favorite character was the camel Felix, Tracy Morgan who had the most zany, crazy, and comedic punch of the whole movie with his sarcasm and sheer idiocy. All in all, they do their parts well, and create that wholesome family feeling.

 

Artistic Tale of Christmas:  When it comes to religious and kid’s movie, it can be difficult to find the balance that lays between cheesy, annoying, and of overzealous religious zeal.  Fortunately, the Star was able to accomplish this goal to the point that it delivers the manner in a heartfelt way without falling into Hallmark sappiness territory.  The Star maintains its cute, slapstick tones throughout the whole movie up to the predictable ending that we all know is coming.  And when that climax occurs, it somehow delivers the powerful message and keeps things fun, which isn’t easy given the imbalance that plagues the cinematic world.  Nevertheless, this movie has an art to its delivery, which nets points in my book.

 

DISLIKES:

 

Character Use:  The Star is another example of jumping the gun and hiring too many actors for a limited cast.  While there are a few characters, Bo, Dave, and the wolves, who get an adequate amount of screen time on camera, many of the characters are reduced to unnecessary cameos that serve little purpose.  The Field Mouse, the random goat, even the bad king himself are just expensive shout outs that could have been used towards developing a stronger story.  Hollywood may be doing favors for the friends, but this reviewer found much of the characters a waste of time.

 

The story: Before you shout blasphemy towards me, I don’t hate the first Christmas story, far from it.  What I mean in this dislike is how bare the story felt in this telling. It’s one geared towards kids, doing little to curtail the story to adults, which limits its entertainment purposes for a variety of people. Yes, I get it, it’s a kid’s movie, but think of how well Pixar can cater to both audiences and get the job done.  The Star’s message is great, the package is cute, but it’s limited in the audience members it can truly entertain. 

 

The Animation:  Other major studios know that every detail is important in animation.  While Bo and the main characters movements look great, the rest of the characters (primarily the secondary background characters) walk stiff or are limited in their movements.  While a minor dislike to some, this reviewer has developed an eye for world building, and the Star kind of failed on that level for me. Biblical times may not have been the mega city behemoths of the modern world, but I’m pretty sure it had more splendor than this movie made it out to be.  The Star seemed to cut costs on this movie where it could, unfortunately making the world succumb to characters caught in mundane worlds.

 

The VERDICT:

 

            The Star is cute, it’s spiritual, and it is one of the most family friendly movies of the entire year to bring your little ones too.  With good primary animation, voice acting that is energetic and fun presentation, this is a Christmas story I can get on board with.  However, this studio dropped the ball on using their characters and world building, cutting corners to give a simplistic presentation that is dull compared to Disney’s worlds.  In addition, the limited audience entertainment faction is also a strike against a tale that held much potential.  The Star is good for a church group to go to, but it’s place would have been better in a direct release film in my opinion, instead of a costly theater run.

 

My scores are:

Animation/Adventure/Comedy:  6.5

Movie Overall: 5.5-6.0

Boo 2 or Boo Hoo? Madea’s Familiar Tactics Will Treat Fans to Laughs, but Not To Plot

Madea 2

 

Hellur!  No, I’m not ill, it’s just a signature catchphrase of none other than Madea, the Mad Black Woman who brings her own sense of justice to so many.  Tyler Perry’s signature character has made her mark for so many years, teaching lessons in her own unique manner.  These movies have come in all sorts of scenarios, many being close carbon copies of the predecessors that laid the foundation.  This series continues to rope loyal fans into the theater though, never tiring of the gimmicks cooked up at Perry Studios.  Tonight, the sequel to Madea’s Halloween tale emerges, in hopes of mimicking the success it brought not long ago.  What’s the verdict?  Robbie K, here asking you to read on to find out his opinions.

 

LIKES:

 

Familiarity:  When it comes to Madea, you don’t expect much deviation from the formula, a comforting factor indeed.  Perry’s writing doesn’t try to be anything it’s not, and that nets some respect in bringing the laughs that make so many laugh.  And if you’re a fan of this series, you’ll have nothing to fear in regards to the comedy at hand (as evidenced by many people howling with laughter in my showing.)

 

Plenty of Madea:  Some Madea movies don’t do give the mad lady her adequate screen time, choosing instead to go for a more drama (soap opera like) plot. Boo 2 is more than happy to give you a Madea fix, with much of the 100-minute run time staying on our “protagonist.”  She leads much of the banter, and her insults are more than enough to keep things engaging alongside her older colleagues.  So, for a movie promising Madea, this film delivers on this aspect as well.

 

Fast Pace:  Another positive for Boo 2 is that the movie doesn’t dawdle when it comes to getting to the laughs.  A small, simplistic opening makes way to the comedy at hand, taking less than 20 minutes to get to the first bout of Madea running her mouth.  Once that first joke flies, the movie continues at a steady pace and creating the effect of time flying (seriously had no idea an hour had passed). This leads to an entertaining environment that is simply fun on many levels, that’s right no complicated thinking in this film.

 

Joe:  By far the best part of the movie for me is Madea’s brother Joe.  While his sexually harsh jokes, lack of respect for others, and intense focus on drugs are not my main source of humor, this character has some of the best comedic moments of the movie.  His timing is well-executed, and his lines are just harsh enough to offset the bickering this movie holds within.  The piece de resistance though, is how well Perry delivers that gruff edge in his humor to maximize the punch of the line and keep the laughs fresh.  I found myself laughing the most with his scenes and was glad to see more Joe in this film.

 

DISLIKES:

 

Unoriginal: Familiarity is fun and entertaining, but it is also lacking the original twist I like to see in the films.  Every Madea film has a slight twist to it, but this film is too much a copy of the first Halloween movie that the tactics are fairly stale. Had it not been for the comedic timing at some parts of the movie, the bantering would have gotten much staler as the old folks complained about the same things consistently.  This dislike also goes to the fact that Madea’s jokes are losing favor with me, especially when they drop the morals for incoherent babbling and arguing.

 

The College Kids:  If you read my last Madea review, you know the college kids didn’t impress me.  Sadly, this movie managed to make me loathe these characters even more.  Rather than giving the younger characters some admirable qualities, outside of superficial looks, Perry crafted them to be the same, shallow, annoying selves they were in the past, only much worse.  The fraternity brother are even hornier, stupid meatheads with little contribution to the movie.  Leah (Lexy Panterra) is reduced to a squabbling airhead, who does little, but flash off her own body with overacted gestures and a skin-tight leopard shirt.  Yet, the worst character goes to Tiffany (Diamond White) the arrogant brat who supposedly learned her lesson last time. After all the punishing blows, the hotheaded teen hasn’t learned a thing and has fallen back into the same annoying qualities I despised in the first film.  What’s even more pathetic, is that they don’t use her selfishness very well to drive a moral filled plot, but just as a tool for more jokes.  Sadly, this movie doesn’t give the satisfying punch that its predecessor accomplished.

 

No story:  Boo 2’s other major dislike for me is that lack of a story.  It’s true, the movie runs at a quick pace and is entertaining, but the trailers have tricked you into thinking there is a story.  This particular Madea story is the lamest story of the bunch, with only a hair thin plot to ground the comedy too. Past this skeletal frame, the movie is only about cramming the most jokes into the run time, which also took away from the Madea formula.

 

The VERDICT:

 

Boo 2 is a sequel that accomplishes the goal of making you laugh with the same familiar tactics Perry has capitalized on for the last decade.  It’s simple fun, fast paced humor will keep fans howling in delight, while also welcoming a new age in with its simplicity.  Yet, I found this movie to be the weakest of the installments, particularly due to the unbalanced characters and lack of story to guide the mischief better.  Safe to say this movie is meant for home viewing pleasure where you can enjoy the banter and insults with better snacks and bathroom privileges.

 

My scores:

 

Comedy/Horror: 7.0

Movie Overall: 5.0

For Fans of Series: Pony Power. For General Fans: A long Hour

pony

 

Cartoons have drastically changed over the years, and in many cases not for the better.  However, amidst this new wave of modern art stand a few series that have soared in popularity enough to acquire mass marketing.  One of these “treasures” is My Little Pony, a collection of toys that have kept their hooves into the pulse of relevance and captured the hearts of many ages.  This weekend, the series proved popular enough to warrant a movie, in hopes of keeping the magic strong.  Robbie K here, accompanied with my friends, with another review, hoping to help guide your viewing pleasures.  Let’s go!

 

LIKES:

 

Cute:  It’s a movie about talking ponies, of course it is going to be cute.  This film capitalizes on the big sparkling eyes, high pitched voices, and snappy one-liners that are all the rage in kid’s animation. But amidst these ear-splitting tactics, the theme of friendship may also warm your heart and make you say Awwwwwww, much like many of the young viewers did today. Side note, the cute also coincides with a family friendly theme as well, so one doesn’t have to worry about mature surprises.

 

Pony Adventure:  When TV shows are given a block buster movie, one fears that it may deviate far from the show, unless you’re a kid in which case you don’t care.  Good news, this movie feels like an extended My Little Pony episode, filled with all the adventure like elements that have made the show fun. The simplistic goals, the musical numbers, the feel-good atmosphere, and the grandiose villain whose bark is worse than its bite.  It’s all packed in the 1.5 hours and amplified with an atmosphere that feels like a kid’s version of lord of the rings.  All this positivity will certainly bring you into the kid mindset and add a little more joy to your experience, or annoy you depending on your tolerance to this series.

 

The Animation:  One thing I love about Hollywood budgets is the ability to capitalize on technology. My Little Pony took the technology and ran with it, crafting an incredible display of cartoon animation to keep me hooked into the movie. The movements of the heroes are fluid, the flying in particular was impressive to watch as it added excitement to the mix. The attention to detail to accurately capture lip movements is also impressive, as it adds that anthropomorphic touch they were going for.  Outside of movements though, this film is a colorful display, brimming with various hues and shades that brings out the unique character design even more. 

 

DISLIKES:

 

Annoying at times:  If you aren’t younger than 8, or a die-hard fan of the series, you will most likely get a little annoyed at times.  The movie goes a little overboard with its gimmicks, primarily with Pinkie Pie’s overzealous energy, that hits that tolerance wall and shatters it. These elements are to be expected, but when you combine it with younger audience member’s inability to remain quiet… it pushes those buttons even faster.

 

Shallow Elements:  I didn’t expect much character development as this was done in the show.  However, the elements you are going to base the story on, I expect there to be more commitment to this.  My Little Pony the movie was able to execute a few characters quite well including Tempest and her little crony alongside Princess Twilight.  The other characters though…well they dropped the ball on their development pretty hard.  Many of the new additions to the universe come in with a flashy opening, often in the form of an inspiring song that holds promise for a colorful character.  But then that flash fades and the characters are hastily tossed to the background until the end.  The multiple incidents of glazing over the characters didn’t impress me, and proves again that too many characters in a movie, do not make quality films.

 

Not Theatrical Special:  Despite the shortcomings of the characters, the story team managed to craft a salvageable story.  Unfortunately, it didn’t’ feel theater worthy to me. Sure, the animation and voice acting were incredible and worthy of the bigger budget.  Then the predictable plot hit me and I realized this story didn’t stand out enough to be considered unique.  In addition, the movie seemed geared towards the music instead of the other crucial elements, which only further made me feel this wasn’t the theater worthy masterpiece they wanted.  Such a shame given the groundwork already laid by the shows team.

 

The VERDICT:

 

            My Little Pony the Movie should have been, My Little Pony the Extended 5 part special.  It is a cute, fun, well-animated adventure perfect for the younger audience members, but outside of that there isn’t much.  While it does capture the feeling of the series, there wasn’t enough in this movie to warrant a theater viewing.  Die-hard fans won’t mind much of my dislikes, but for the general audience your money is better spent on a more balanced movie that won’t make you pull your hair out or try to take a nap. 

 

My scores are:

 

Animation/Adventure/Comedy:  7.5

Movie Overall: 6.0  

A Cruise Of Crime is Made Okay

American

 

 

American politics is a theater that continues to garner more attention than even the biggest award shows.  The players in their games can be just as interesting, especially in how far they go to accomplish their tasks.  My second review of the weekend focuses on one such person named Barry Seal, a famous American pilot who was a cog in so many aspects. What does this movie have in store for us?  Robbie K here to fill in on the latest biography and give you insight into another silver screen story.  Let’s go

 

LIKES:

 

The Setting: Technology’s progression allows us to do many things, and one is recreating the past. American Made is a shining example of Hollywood’s ability to recreate the trends of the decades, from what towns/cities looked like to the fashion and cars that filled them.  You’ll be pulled back in time with this film, and become integrated in the world and fully diving into the world crafted by Seal’s actions. In addition, it’s also fun to see old news’ broadcasts integrated into the mix, further amping up the story.   And for all you nostalgia lovers out there, feel free to have fun remembering the adventures you back then.

 

Cruise’s Acting:  Say what you want about Tom Cruise’s personal life, but the man can certainly play his roles well.  Cruise comes in spades with this film, capturing arrogance, coyness, and that adventurous spirit all in one sitting.  His skills will bring out the emotions of the time period, the fear of being that pivotal chess piece that so many depend on.  Cruise’s chemistry with all his co-actors is favorable, resulting in a performance that feels natural. In addition, his dynamic abilities to transition between sub roles, further brings the character to life, an essential for a key role.

 

Thorough Tale:  Biographies are only as fascinating as the story presented, which often requires details.  Our directors/screenwriters have got you covered in this movie, sparing no time cost to hit all the deals that Seal was involved in.  Their presentation keeps guides you well in this movie, using captioned slide transitions and Cruise’s comedic dialogue to set the time and place of the next adventure.  It’s an easy tale to keep up with and hits so many qualities of Seal’s life in tandem to his antics (including family, friends, and even sanity).  I felt that of all the books brought to life, this was one that hit the closest to home.

 

DISLIKES:

 

Magic vs Reality:  The challenge with these films is determining what is real and what is overdramatized.  There are plenty of moments where that question comes up, as the cast of characters appears with grandiose gestures and presentations to corrupt the system. As the story progresses, the whole conspiracy gets even larger and the drama amps up to levels that are hard to believe.  The over dramatization gets a little cheesy at times, and made me roll my eyes at the extremes the legal system went to and how untrustworthy they were. Fans of this style though, will easily be hooked into the escapades of the movie.

 

Skimped on other factors:  While American Made touches on many aspects of the film, there was an imbalance in how much they would focus on those other aspects.  The family aspect was so heavily influenced at the beginning, but then gets diluted down to background noise and occasional shots.  Same thing goes for a few business partners he contracts as well, a rather focused opening, but then runs out of gas. While I give them props for keeping things concise, the disjunction between these aspects is a little disappointing to me, especially how one would affect the other.  In addition, these rushed elements took the suspense away from me.

 

The wasted sequences:  The most annoying thing for me though, were the tangential flashes that occur in this movie.  Seal’s memories are fascinating to see, but there are a few of them that were pointless to have sequences for.  An example is him randomly saying he had kids, only to flash to a scene of her in labor for a brief comedic relief.  While a noble attempt, it was nothing a well-placed line could have done as well. There are other examples as well that all could have been left out, thereby further reducing the run length.

 

 

The VERDICT:

 

            American Made is a great biography that has some flare other biographies have lacked for me.  Cruise leads the way in terms of strengths for this movie, but the world and tale itself are an entertaining venue to watch.  Yet, there are plenty of overdramatic moments and wasted shots that have made this a glorified Netflix/History Channel worthy production.  If you are looking for a good biography though, scope this one out, otherwise wait for next week’s releases before going to the theater. 

 

My scores;

 

Action/Biography/Comedy:  8.0

Movie Overall:  7.0