Thrills Are The Hunters, but Story Is The Prey



The horror genre continues to try and limp its way back into the limelight, and outside of the promise of a cheap gimmick, they continue to barely hold a place in Hollywood.  Yet the dark stories they try to sell us are often enough to hook many in tackling the potential scares to see how the cast will do against the supernatural odds.  Strangers: Prey At Night is going to attempt to bait many to come into the theaters this weekend and yours truly is back with another review to help you determine is this the movie for you.  Let’s get this started, shall we?




Thrilling Pace

-Quick Run Time

-Creepy atmosphere

-The 80’s soundtrack

-Wraps Up, kind of


The Strangers doesn’t pull any punches in regards to getting the horror themes started.  A looming threat of death keeps the movie at a good pace, almost like the most dangerous game coming to life with a soap opera twist.  As the “heroes” try to move amidst the maze of trailers, the ever-looming dread lurking in the shadows of the Strangers hunting their prey.  This fast pace keeps the film moving, and due to a wise decision to not get too ingrained in the horror elements, the movie is over pretty quickly.

Is it scary?  The answer to that is surprisingly yes, but more so in how creepy the movie is.  The realism of how people can go crazy and take pleasure in death to set such an elaborate trap gets to me, the chills that such sickness exists to this manner is the biggest element.  As the feeling of being stranded sets in, the movie does a nice job throwing some jump scares into the mix to try and keep you on edge.  So yeah, it has factors that scary.

As for the rest of the movie quirks, well the little gimmick of the soundtrack is entertaining not only in hearing legendary songs rock the theater walls, but also in how the songs match up with the mood of that scene. It makes for an interesting spin, and I liked the cheesy element adding a little class.  And I always do enjoy horror movies that do an ending right and The Strangers wrap up nicely, while leaving a little mystery, shock, and suspense to sweeten the deal for those who don’t want a fairy tale ending.



Crappy Character Development

-Lazy Writing

-Unrealistic Response

-Unnecessary Drawn Out


The Strangers has plenty of things to improve on from the scary base it tries to establish.  For one thing, I like a horror movie where I get to actually know the characters that are potentially going to diet, you know with a backstory and development.  Not the case with this movie, the Strangers both hunters and hunted, are almost one-dimensional with little to no backstory.  Therefore, you are just seeing strange people running around at night and potentially dying…great job guys.

The character development also isn’t the only lazy thing about this movie.  The Strangers has no heart behind it, with so much of it being simplistic, gory thrills and little wit to the adventure at hand.  There were too many coincidences happening from the strangers mysteriously finding them to a clever tool laying nearby.  In addition, the characters were a little too stupid as well, resulting in unrealistic situations that extended the adventure, but were eye rolling more than anything.  When it came to giving motives and more sinister methods, again they failed to elaborate on this, with the only answer being “Why Not”.  Clever guys.  In addition, the prey seemed to be demi-gods, able to not only survive pretty debilitating injuries, but somehow inconsistently respond to those wounds depending on how long they have to run.

And given all the drawn out torture, cutting, and destruction of ligaments in this movie, you would think the rest of their bodies would fail, but nope…they were just fine.  And as for the torture, sometimes it was a little too spread out for me at times, and when given the realistic twist, was a direction I didn’t want to go down.  Oh well, got to love deranged directing right?




            The Strangers attempted to pay homage to a genre that has undergone many face lifts to keep up with the modern era, but it is grossly imbalanced to fully deliver on the promised nightmares it wanted to induce. Sure, there is suspense, a quick pace, and some creepy factors to get under your skin alongside the bloody carnage of torture.  Yet, the Strangers was just lazy on so many levels, relying on too many well-timed gimmicks, one-dimensional characters, and unrealistic responses that just didn’t sell the movie.  So those looking to enjoy a ridiculous man hunt with gore filled torture should go all in for this movie.  However, I recommend skipping this one and rewatching the 2008 version of it instead. 


My scores are:

Horror:  6.0

Movie Overall: 5.0


Sexy, Sleek, and A Spy Thriller Indeed

Red Sparrow


Jennifer Lawrence, a chameleon in many forms as to what role she will play and how well she will act in it.  What is never questionable though, is that it will often involve some type of edge, with some anger thrown into the mix.  And this weekend, yet another film for her to exercise her emotions is back in the form of Red Sparrow, the latest spy thriller to sneak into the theaters.  The movie promises to be the same intense dynamics, perhaps with a little sexiness thrown in.  Does the movie have the same fire that it’s lead actress has, or is it another flop?  Robbie K happy to help you out with another movie decision with yet another review.  Let’s get started:




Costumes:  In a spy movie of such caliber, you are hoping that the costumes are going to be chic, sexy, and feel like the super spy role.  Red Sparrow’s costumes are worthy of the mantle of high fashion, being pleasant on the eyes and fitting so well with the roles given to Ms. Lawrence. They add a nice flare to the movie, being utilized to sell her cover and infiltrate the secrets held within all parties, and in such a subtle way as that.  It’s a small like, but one that warrants appreciation.


The Strong Woman Character:  If it’s a Jennifer Lawrence role, it’s going to involve a strong female role and Red Sparrow is again no exception to the movement of strong female characters.  Dominika has many layers, all built around a solid core value of family, bringing duty and loyalty to the heart of her character.  They build upon these values, weaving a complex character who with each peel exposes layers that continue to evolve with each dive into the dark depths of espionage.  And as more characters join the deadly game, Dominika gets to adapt in an attempt to juggle all the information being handed to her.  And not only do her actions speak volumes, but Dominika has a few lines to throw out that are empowering to many in the theater.  I enjoyed the strong, ever adapting character that hopefully can teach a few lessons amidst the destruction taking place.


True Spy Thriller:  With James Bond films, we’ve been spoiled with the spy and action series blending together.  Yet, the world of espionage is a lot less flashy given the emphasis of blending in and breaching the trusts of so many people. Red Sparrow flies into the territory of representing the espionage game, utilizing heavy writing, ingenuity, throwing out plenty of leads, and utilizing plenty of tactics to complicate the tale.  The mysteries that are presented are the lure to keep you invested in the 2 hour 19 minute run time, all screaming of a true spy thriller that has been missing for some time, including an ending that is worthy of being called a respectable twist.




Slow:  Sadly, the movie is very slow at parts, focusing more on the jargon, psychology, and training that is involved in this harsh environment.  While this is interesting, it is also very hard to keep attention when the plot doesn’t move to keep the thrills going and make learning the information fun.  Spy thrillers need to be thrilling, and I didn’t really get into the plot until the last thirty minutes of the film when the stakes increased dramatically.  Drama fans won’t have quite as big of an issue with this, because the love, sex, and relationships fill these slow moments, but fans like me need to have some coffee before coming in.


Complicated Jargon:  This goes with the slow speed, but Red Sparrow is not a conversation light movie.  Where many movies have simplistic dialogue that leads you in a linear fashion. Red Sparrow however is like one of those word webs, with so much spreading out it can be confusing to piece things together without paying major attention.  So many relationships to keep track of and so much information to maintain, you have to keep everything in check to figure out what the point of all this is.  And given how the tone of the characters fluctuates, it can sometimes be difficult to hear what they are saying as the cavalcade talk in whispers and hushed tones.


Graphic TortureSerial killers rejoice, you’ll see the dark dealings of punishment unfold in very disturbing moments, but for others with weaker constitutions you’ll need to turn away. There is plenty of Red in this movie, and not in the slasher movie cheesiness Hollywood has made famous.  This movie has been majorly grounded in terms of thrills, but with it comes some realism that is more gruesome to see.  I appreciate this darkness to some extent, but the there are some nightmare inducing images, and in some cases a little unnecessary to the story.




            Despite all the mixed reviews, I think that Red Sparrow is a fine film that shows off Lawrence’s talents to be edgy and a strong women character.  The film has plenty of mystery to solve as you try to uncover the true meaning behind this thriller, searching for any information possible.  And given all this convoluted information, this movie certainly is the closest thing to an espionage film we’ve gotten in a long while.  Yet, the movie is slow, and geared more toward romantic drama lovers who could care less about the story and more about the sabotage the characters throw at each other.  Nevertheless, this dark story is not for the faint of focus and should be geared towards those who like a darker story with lots of kinks to unravel.  My scores are:


Mystery/Thriller:  7.0

Movie Overall:  6.0

The 15:17 to Realism

15-17 to paris.jpg


Biography movies, another genre victim to dramatization, editing cuts, and wild cards in terms of quality to tell the story.  Yet the great Clint Eastwood has proven to be quite the artist to bring these movies to life in that dark, emotional, presentation we all love.  So, with another biography being released this weekend, yours truly is back to the trenches to give you some insight into the latest movies to sweep the nation.  What is in store for you?  Please read on to find out as I cover: The 15:17 to Paris.



Realistic: The movie’s highlight for me is how realistic the journey is, at least in terms of how their life progresses.  That Hollywood magic of instant success, of things falling into the right place at the right time, are essentially absent in this film.  You’ll get to see the struggles of the character’s lives, feel the stinging defeat at the limitations that were in their way, and experience the frustration at the ambiguity life holds. If realism and facts are your preference in these movies, then this film delivers on this premise and probably as close to the truth as you’ll get outside of talking to them.


A Fun Vacation:  The chronicle of the heroes’ journey has some pretty fabulous settings that they transverse too.  As the trio begin to tour Europe, you really get to see some fabulous sights of the culture held on that continent.  The way the film is presented, this component of the movie is a fun breakup of the drama, and if you’re like me and haven’t traveled internationally, a nice way to drink in the settings.  In addition, this was probably the most entertaining component of the film.


Cinematography:  The movie also gets massive props for the utilization of camera work to sell the emotion of the moment.  Eastwood’s latest film doesn’t have the most memorable moments in acting, but the camera picks up the slack.  Key close ups, dynamic angles, and a constantly evolving structure are the components that help bring this tale to life for me.  Once the sound editing and musical scores come in, that is when the scenes come together and paint the emotional tension of the film.


Quick Pace:  Can’t lie, biographies sometimes knock my energy out depending on how long and slow they go.  Like the train though, this movie moves at a very brisk pace, unyielding to the distracting tangents and keeping the film on pace.  As such, this film didn’t lose me and I got to appreciate the tale from start to finish.




Overdramatic opening:  The film starts with a glimpse back into the hero’s childhood days, which can be a tough time.  For me though, these opening moments were where the acting suffered the most.  Many of the teachers seemed to be overly grandiose in their negativity, their attitudes, and prejudice towards the kids.  During parent-teacher conferences, these discussions turned into absurd arguments that seemed more extreme than necessary and to the point of eye-rolling for me.  It’s all based on perspective, but the monstrous portrayal of these teachers either indicates action for their termination, or another example of movie magic gone wrong.


Piecemeal Presentation:  I liked the presentation at the start, the integration of the actual event, intertwined with their history.  So, I’m unsure why this concept was dropped a third of the way into the film and ditched for a different presentation. Even weirder, is that the movie felt very piecemeal to me, starting down one angle only to again drop it without any major resolution.  Eastwood’s team kept taking leaps and bounds across the story including: hastily finishing the kid story, dropping the challenges in training, and in many cases forgetting the other major characters.  Speaking of which…


One character vs. Three:  The trailers say the film is about the three heroes of the movie, and it starts out that way.  Then once again the other characters get pushed to the back burner, pretty much forgotten until halfway through the final act.  Were the other’s tales just that lacking?  Was it because only one of them did a lot of the physical work in the actual event the reason he was awarded most of the screen time?  Honorable as this may be, the false advertising didn’t impress me so much in the film on something that based its promotion on three characters.  Sorry guys, but the occasional shot of the friends doesn’t count as major storytelling.


Overhyped End:  Don’t get me wrong, hostile attacks in any form are intense, scary, and traumatic.  Yet, the hype the trailers placed on this movie was not fulfilled for me.  The tension was low, the theatrics were gone, and in truth it was over in the blink of the eye.  Again, I appreciate the realism, but a little magic at this point could have amped up the suspense and pulled me more into the story. I guess when you expect all three to have majorly stopped the incident, you expect bigger bang, so shame on me for that.  Still, not the most climactic thrills to grace the screen. 





            Eastwood is famous for biographies, but this one didn’t have quite the investment, heart, and dynamic his other works have had.  The 15:17 to Paris is certainly a more realistic movie, that keeps a quick pace and nice cinematography to tell pieces of a tale.  While I enjoyed the vacation, aspects presented in the film, the movie failed to unite the fragments together, leading to a very haphazard and unfinished tale for me to enjoy.  With all the hype, I expected more of Eastwood’s dramatic flair to take hold, but this film didn’t quite live up to what the trailers presented.  So, if you’re looking for a realistic, big budget documentary hit the theaters, but my opinion is to save this one for a legal home viewing. 


My scores:

Drama/History/Thriller:  5.5

Movie Overall: 4.0

Freed At Last, Freed At Last



The international best seller that changed the world is a topic of much debate.  Tasteless porn vs. incredible love story, this series has two extreme groups fighting for superiority on what is the truth to the Grey series.  However, since many people don’t read these days, Hollywood has brought a visual representation to us to help stem the tide and get more people discussing the content of E.L James work.  And so, yours truly, alongside some very kind friends, heads into the trenches to give you another review on what is what in the movies.  Let’s get going!




The Romance:  The romance, as the fans will call it, has finally improved to the levels many wanted it to be from the start.  Fifty Shades Freed finally has our actor’s chemistry mixing well to portray a more realistic love story than what I’ve seen.  Rather than bland, uninterested looks, Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan finally have some heat into their acting actually seeming to love each other than just tolerate.  The drama that fans want is packed into their on-screen time, a nice balance of overdramatic anger, passion, and desire in their little game of domination cat and mouse.  While still unbelievable at times, the magic finally raised to a new level for the final installment.


The JokesSuch a dark delicacy as this requires some more adult humor, and Fifty Shades Freed’s writing is able to bring this humor to full blast.  Clever alliterations, metaphors, and puns are well integrated into the goopy, lovey dovy, romantic bologna this movie is famous for.  These comedic devices are well-timed and well-delivered to maximize the punch that comes with it and had my friends and I chuckling.  Had there been a few more of these moments, the movie’s writing might have gotten even more points for creativeness and magic.


Semi-Tasteful: Despite the sultry atmosphere contained in these films, the censorship is still decent enough to add some class to the movie.  Rather than diving into the pornographic details that some of the fan-base loves, the movie keeps the camera work on the upper areas, straying away from the lower anatomy.  Even the love making scenes have been tempered a bit to not dive into XXX levels, but it barely skims by this.  Still, the small bit of class gets my nod of respect.


The Ending:  My friends and I agreed that the nice little nod to the series as the end was a good way to cap of the series.  Simplistic and predictable yes, but for those super fans, it is the emotional finesse you may have come to expect in the series.  And for the beginning credit, and only clip, it’s the ending that had many in my showing ahhing in delight.


The Music:  My final nod is at the director of music, who once again picks a slamming song track to represent the emotion of the scene.  A combination of genres, the selections are worthy of another soundtrack worth purchasing, assuming you are into those kinds of things.





The Sex:  Let’s get this out of the way.  No surprise, I’m not the biggest fan of watching two actors make strong, awkward, and often strange sex fantasies come to life.  And Fifty Shades Freed was more than happy to throw a lot of these vivid images at me.  While a bit classy, these scenes didn’t fit into the story as much for me, nor did I really appreciate how fast and rapid they were crammed in.  The positive side is that these montages are at most 3.5 minutes long, but I’ll never look at ice cream the same way again…. Ewwwww.


Secondary Characters:  I don’t remember the books quite well, but I’m fairly certain the secondary cast goes farther than their cinematic doppelgangers.  Yes, I know the story is mainly about the star-cross lusters, I mean lovers, but this supporting group of families and friends should be you know… more supportive.  So why were much of the supporting band reduced to mere minutes of screen time with little to add to this tale?  A few clips of beautiful people, a tempting dramatic flair that goes nowhere, a shallow proposal that is cute but lacking, and some shotty presentation of key story elements are all they contribute.  After such integration in the first film, I had hoped for these components to strengthen as well, but they failed on this aspect for me outside of the fact that so many of them were pretty to look at.


Boring Tension:  Let’s face it, the story is not the best part of these series, but I had hoped that the antagonist would have had more bite to his coiffed hair.  Fifty Shares Freed did little to amplify the deadliness of Hyde, outside of making him look and sound even more insane.  The promise of a man with more brains and strategy was lost to low grade soap opera antics that just served as an example of poor planning.  I’ve seen better villains in a cheesy soap opera, and this anticlimactic climax was so disappointing to see fail.  While many may not be looking for super excitement, this reviewer would have liked to see more bite than bark.  Oh well, at least more room for love, right?




            Overall, Fifty Shade Freed has improved in regards to the romance that this series has tried to sell.  The heated passion between the main characters took some major steps towards progress in this series, alongside the jokes, the soundtrack, and the nicely packaged ending.  However, the story itself is laughable, with all these plot points and known character diluted into less concentrated beings that are only there for a quick head nod out of the series.  Fifty Shades Freed is a glorified soap opera on the big screen, and therefore not worth the price of admission in my opinion, no matter how passionate, emotional, and hot it may seem.  Save this one for the privacy of your own home and your imagination. 


My scores are:

Drama/Romance/Thriller:  5.0

Movie Overall:  4.0

A Cure To Extra Movies Telling The Story!

Death Cure


Books, once the primary medium for telling stories, has now become the newest screenplay source for Hollywood.  The big wigs are back this weekend with another dystopian novel coming up to the big screen in hopes of concluding the tale with that justice fans demand.  As these series are a mixed bag (Hunger games vs. Divergent), one may wonder how this book will fair, especially with the mixed response the first two have had.  Robbie K here, hoping to help you out with another movie weekend and hopefully save you some time and money.  Let’s go!




Strong Opening:  You always like your movie to grab your attention from the start, and the Death Cure is happy to accommodate.  The movie takes little time to get the excitement going, pumping into an action scene and kicking the pace off to 4th gear.  Even after the scene finishes, the movie sets things up quickly, to keep the pace and tension going, a plus given the long run time. I myself enjoyed the opening act of the film and how it was able to establish all three-story fronts and run them in tandem, accomplishing the balance of concise and complete.


Acting: To make these classics come to life, one must get the cast just right to bring these characters off the page.  Well the squad who was cast long ago, continues their strong work of capturing Thomas and his band of merry men.  Dylan O’Brien is the leading man again, getting the rebellious, battle hardened leader role down.  Stoic and heroic are his leading qualities, but handling that emotional vulnerability that comes with the role was a challenge well accomplished by this actor.  Ki Hong Lee, while not quite the champion he was in the first two installments, still keeps his calm in his role, securing the suffering portrayal and for once not sounding sexual when a character screams.  Kaya Scodelario as Theresa was a little dry and mundane at times, but starts to redeem herself and get her complexities down at the climax of the movie. And my favorite of the characters, Newt played by Thomas Brodie-Sangster who got all the emotions right, played the transition roles to point, and delivered some of the best speeches I’ve heard in a character. 


The Suspense: What I liked about this movie the most though, is how well they captured the suspense and tension of the film.  Unlike the earlier installments that hit those dead moments, the third installment manages to keep things always moving and on the edge.  With suspense and thrills packed in, it’s hard not to get lost in all the action on board and its nail biting, cleverness.  Loaded into this excitement though, is a bounty of emotions that rope you into the character’s struggles and tether the chaos to the story.  Riding this roller coaster was very satisfying, and personally, I loved how engged these characters were into the film as the epic conclusion started to arise.


The Final Scene: And after all this excitement, comes a finish that was perfect to wrap up the chaos at hand.  While not the most complete in terms of answers, the finale’s combination of epic soundtrack, emotional monologue, and cinematography brought goosebumps to my skin, and no it wasn’t due to a virus.  It’s this final punch that finally shows you can take a book series and end it epically, so stick around ladies and gents to see how trials finish up.




No refresher:  In most of these movies, the writers are able to remind you of the previous events in either dialogue or an opening montage.  Death Cure doesn’t remotely try to attempt to give you a refresher course, and for those who haven’t seen the films or reread the novels, you are on your own for connecting the dots.


The Length: You know there has to be massive entertainment or an engaging twist to keep you hooked into the movie.  And while Death Cure was exciting, I couldn’t justify the movie being past 120 minutes.  Much of the extra length came from drawn out chases and dialogue that were bloated examples of arrogance.  These moments might have held tension, but eventually got too drawn out for me, and had be begging for a conclusion.  Nevertheless, the suspenseful moments of the film sometimes turned into ridiculousness for me, because they seemed to move at half speed to get to the predictable ending.  More editing would have been a plus here.


The Coincidences:  Can’t tell if this was the theme in the book, but did the events really rely on this much serendipity and suspense of belief.  I’m not talking about the dystopia feel, or the zombie like cranks that seemed to be the latest overplayed creature.  No, my beef  comes with how inconsistent or stretching one sees them take with things like bullet proof glass suddenly breaking, convenient structural integrity collapse, and how the creatures somehow don’t attack the outskirts of the last city.  With all of these conveniences, it was hard for me not to laugh at these choices as they became a rather weak wrap up.


Reduction of Characters:  I give these guys props for integrating so many characters, but this film kind of dropped both plot and characters into the background, more than I would have expected.  Some of our heroes from the last movie have barely ten minutes in the film, and other major villains don’t have quite the bite that one would have expected from the trailers.  Even new characters making their appearance were a little drab, not in terms of looks, but again in a leaner story that I thought was more prominent in the book than on the screen.  Why we didn’t see more of these rag tag mercenaries and supporting characters , I don’t know, but again balance is key.




            Maze Runner: Death Cure was a good conclusion to the trilogy for this reviewer.  The cast continues to remain strong, with a strong set of scenes to grip you into the action and lock in the suspense to come over the 120 minute run time.  And the fact they crafted a finale without going into an extra film wins bonus points for me. However, the movie is a bit unnecessarily long for me, failing to impress with exaggerated chase scenes that come to a convenient ending. In addition, the characters they highlight in the trailers, primarily the new antagonists, needed some better balance for me to help bring this final installment to the top.  Still, given all the excitement and special effects, as well as an emotionally packed story, this trilogy’s finale is worth a trip to the theaters.


My scores are:


Action/Sci-Fi/Thriller:  8.0

Movie Overall: 7.0

Rolling Into Action/Drama Than Thriller


Tina Turner, made the big hit song that brought pep to step and got people rolling when she crafted the song Proud Mary.  Decades later, Hollywood is happy to bring a movie semi-inspired by the song, ready to storm this “holiday” weekend with another action/drama to stand up to The Commuter.  A great move was to hire Taraji P. Henson, a fantastic actress who has the edge for this kind of drama given her track record in this field.  But what else does this film have to offer given its low amount of advertising on cable and internet media?  Robbie K here to shed some light on the subject and help you choose your viewing pleasure.  Let’s go!




Acting ChemistryOne thing I love about African-American movies is how well the cast fits together in whatever project they making.  Henson and crew feel like a mob family, the tension, the doubts, and the anger all similar to what I’ve seen in family affairs.  It seemed to come so naturally to them, no overstretching of their talents to make the closeness work, selling to me that they were indeed a family.  And when Danny (Jahi Di’Allo Winston) joins the family, the young actor and Henson have another chemistry that seems naturally there complete with sass, pizazz, and edge.


The Writing:  While I’m normally not the biggest fan of sass, annoying attitude, or bitter anger as the primary qualities in a character, Proud Mary did a nice job balancing these qualities.  Their character development established the reasons for these attitudes, and the whole mafia element added the tension need to set the stage for these qualities.  Even though the callousness got a little eye rolling at times, (a diluted version of the Godfather), I appreciate the tension and using it to work with the chemistry as opposed to just shock value.  An even more impressive element, is that they were able to interject cursing into the lines without getting to the oversaturation point.  Utilized for emphasis and to express how bad a situation was, the writers/directors accomplished the task of how one should watch their mouth and not over utilize the slang.  Classy and edgy, a nice combination.


The Action:  Yep, action junkies like me love this category, and Proud Mary is able to accomplish this category quite well in terms of storytelling.  There are a couple of fantastic sequences to get the ball rolling, a nice blend of Taken and Wanted without the super gore factor.  While these gunslinger scenes might not be the selling points for some, this film keeps it relevant to the plot and not just a careless waste of resources to add excitement to the list.  The ending in particular will get you rolling like a river, with its emotional charge, character linkage, and pure on intensity of the scene. Plus, utilizing the theme song to amp up the   Again props to this film.




Incredibly rushed:  The problem with this film starts with a very rushed script, which is most likely due to the limited budget of the film.  From the start, Mary’s emotional dilemma is dropped without much buildup, reduced to a quick opening scene and nothing more.  Her career, her skills, her importance to the family, none of these have an inkling of development outside of a few scraps of dialogue tossed into the mafia like meetings that don’t last long. The background information on Danny’s issues, also a sliver of what it could be, just enough to get the point across, but lacking the power to pull your heart strings.  This fast pace keeps the drama entertaining, but it’s lacking in terms of storytelling.


Inconsistent Emotion: The other issue with this movie, is the emotional inconsistency in this film in regards to the characters.  Mary herself fluctuates between cold assassin, angry-ex, and mother love in a manner that represents some mood disorder.  You understand the reasons why, but you don’t see enough even spread of these emotions to get the depth of her character.  In regards to Danny, again the fluctuations are inconsistent as he goes from street hardened, gang busting vigilante to a whiny, arrogant brat whose about to drop tears.  Given more time, this movie might have had the ability to stretch out these emotional moments and balance out there characters more.  Fortunately, the actors are able to keep this roller coaster exchange in check, but it can’t save the direction the writers had them go.


Lackluster villains:  The term bark is worse than their bite has never been truer in a movie. Proud Mary is all about powerful families running their business and trying to keep their territories in check.  And like all the Mafia movies, you expect threats and dealing out those threats.  In Mary’s world though, these guys are all about making threats without acting on them, giving people quite a few chances before they start to make a motion.  Then you get to the action scenes, and again these skilled hitmen don’t seem to have any surmountable talent in comparison to Mary.  Oh sure, it’s another example of superhero power, but the problem is…Mary was supposedly trained with some of these guys and they couldn’t do better.  Again, these inconsistencies just don’t work as a whole with this film, but they at least provide some settings for excitement and adrenaline pumping gun-fu antics to show women assassins are freaking cool.




            Proud Mary keeps on turning out a plethora of components to entertain the masses. The drama associated with the family is something many audience members will love, alongside the balance the writers established between pertinent action and storytelling components.  However, this fast-paced film took some major shortcuts given their limited budget.  While the movie is still entertaining, it suffers from the rushed pace in regards to character development, emotional balance, and background information that could have strengthened this movie.  And while it is awesome to see another femme fatale appear in the studios, it would have only done it more justice if her bad guys had more bite.  While the action scenes certainly bring the effects, this movie just doesn’t have everything together to warrant an absolute visit to the theater.  This reviewer would recommend watching it at home


My scores:


Action/Thriller:  6.5

Movie Overall: 5.0

GeoPower! This Storm Is Stronger Than Expected



There are very few things scarier than a natural disaster.  The sheer power contained within these storms, droughts, and floods is something we as humans have difficulty containing.  Now what would happen if that power could be harnessed by humans, manipulated to our whim in order to keep our world acclimated and functioning perfectly?  Could such a thing be used for good, or would it merely be repurposed as a weapon?  This question is the key concept in my next movie review, titled Geostorm, the latest disaster flick to “storm” into the theaters.  Pun aside, Robbie K is back for another overview, so let’s get started, shall we?




The Sound:  My first like is the incredible sound editing Geostorm contains within it.  These editors “blew” me away with the fantastic renditions of Mother Nature’s torment, capturing all those destructive sounds and unleashing them into the theater.  Lightning filled maelstroms, horrendous fires, and bone chilling ice storms all drop with mighty blow, causing the theater to rumble in delight.  This effect may not seem like much, but it really rounds the experience out and immerses you into the havoc.


The Visuals:  No surprise here, Geostorm’s visuals are also beautiful displays of technology.  We know this genre is all about making disasters look real, and this film brings that power out with little hesitancy.  Watching destruction unfold is breathtaking, as the terrifying mayhem of the manmade storms unfold, helping you experience the horror without actually being there.  Geostorm’s displays, although limited in number, are the selling point of this film, especially during the exciting moments when our characters are trying to navigate their way through the destruction.


Acting:  Sometimes these disaster movies tank on the cast, resulting in whiny, nimrod characters who are asking to be sucked up into a twister.  Not the case for this film. Geostorm’s cast is actually fantastic in bringing their characters to life, and also brings an awesome team to the mix to diversify the genre.  Gerard Butler was a solid choice for the lead, combining action gruff with scientific strategy to craft a tough as nails character to lead the project.  This dynamic nature made a fun hero to root for while seeing him evolve past his flaws.  Jim Sturgess does a bang-up job in his role as well, playing the role of the neurotic congressmen forced to choose between family and job.  His character required a much broader class of emotions, and he manages to hit all of these with little trouble. As for the female leads of Abbie Cornish and Alexandra Maria Lara, these women were incredible displays of girl power in the modern world.  No super powers needed here, for these women have intelligence, ferocity, and heart as they tackle all the demands this movie placed on them, and all with a realistic touch.  I wished they had utilized them a little more, but they maximized their screen time.


The Story:  Despite how cheesy it looked, Geostorm’s story was better than I expected.  The characters have some backstory not lost to the storm, requiring them to grow much like the threat of total cataclysm. During the actual presentation itself, Geostorm is nicely divided into four sections each occurring simultaneously and playing important roles to the dilemma at hand.  Throw in a little mystery to figure out the culprits, and you have a more engaging story line than we typically see in these films.  All in all, they managed to execute this ridiculous concept quite well for me.




Storm moments:  Despite the promise of major cataclysm, Geostorm is surprisingly bare of storm sequences for much of the movie.  Many of these scenes are in the background, with only a few having that thrilling, on the seat edge. In addition, despite being thrilling, these moments get a little too ridiculous, the sheer unrealistic maneuvers violating the science without the technology to do so.  While I appreciate, the disasters fitting into the movie, they still needed a little refining.


The Predictability: Geostorm tries its best to throw you off the trail to the culprits, but the trailers and obvious foreshadowing will give you the answer within the first 30 minutes. In addition, the fate of other characters is not surprising at all, mostly because they figure things out minutes within the film.  Had it not been for the visuals and exciting pace, the story would have been drab and put me to sleep.  I’ll admit there was a nice little uncertain moment, reminiscent of a few other flicks you are certain to remember.  Past that though, it’s a predictable mess indeed.


Underutilized team:  Like many films, our protagonist becomes part of a special team in charge of fixing the problem.  Unfortunately, after the introductions, most of the team is essentially useless save two members who actually get more screen time.  While not as bad as the gang from Wonder Woman, this group just didn’t feel needed in the grand scheme of the picture and could have been utilized in a more conducive environment to add a little more suspense in the mix. Either that or cut the characters to help the budget.




            Despite the cheesy idea, Geostorm was a welcome change to the natural disaster movie collection.  Stunning special effects, a Sci-Fi Esque story, and dynamic characters are certain to entertain fans of this genre and bring with it a nice twist.  However, if you are looking for a storm movie, you need to pick another tale as the disasters are a minimum or overly cheesy to be believable.  Throw in some weaker story elements and predictable plot, and you further weaken the storm they were trying to bring.  Overall not a bad film at all, and the special effects are more than worthy of a theater visit. Otherwise check this one out when it hits home release.


My Scores:


Action/Sci-Fi/Thriller:  7.5

Movie Overall: 6.0