One Day Meets Beatles: Music and Love Story Overpower Interesting Concept

Yesterday Poster

 

We all know music and many of us love it without so much a whim so long as we get the tracks we love.  The artists who work to make music often are recognized more for their abuse of money and fame, rather than the motivation behind their music. So what would happen if you could be that artist you admire so much?  What if you could take credit for their work and nobody had a clue they even existed?  Well that’s where tonight’s movie comes in, and yours truly is here to cover the film to let you know whether or not the film is worth a check out.  Let’s get started as tonight we look at:

 

Movie: Yesterday (2019)

 

Director:

Danny Boyle

Writers:

Jack Barth (story by), Richard Curtis (screenplay)

Stars:

Himesh PatelLily JamesSophia Di Martino

 

LIKES:

 

  • Charming
  • Fun
  • Good Covers
  • Decent Comedic Relief
  • The “cameo”
  • The Artistic Messages
  • The Love Story
  • The Acting

 

DISLiKES:

  • Trailers spoiled Much
  • Kate McKinnon’s Extreme Character
  • Other Secondary Characters Lost
  • A Little Preachy
  • Not Quite The Revelation/Tension I thought

 

SUMMARY:

 

Much like Slumdog Millionaire, Boyle’s work once again manages to capture a charming tale that holds so much in the simplistic story telling. Yesterday was able to bring a lot of fun into the tale, taking the idea of living life as a rock star and using the covers, which are of a good quality, to maximize much of the Beatle’s legacy without the masters themselves being present.  Despite the seriousness of the movie, Yesterday is funny, selecting a drier, English wit that is occasionally spritzed with some American antics including several cameos that are fun to see.  However, Boyle’s accomplishment also is finding a way to incorporate the true film art style by sampling some artistic messages into the love story at hand. Yesterday’s alternate reality is awe inspiring in terms of pulling the blinds of fandom down to reveal the moral testing sacrifices that the music celebrity world requires, managing to test the boundaries of love without diving too far in Hallmark territory.  And it’s actually thanks to the acting that I was able to become entranced by the magic of this film.  There are plenty of actors to talk about, but in reality it’s Patel and James that take center stage, each presenting balanced performances that work in tandem and craft the tale that many will enjoy, again making a believable romance story. 

 

Yet there are a few limitations for me that I have to say I was surprised to see, at least for some of them.  One thing that is not quite a shocker is how much the trailers have given away in the mass franchising, with many key parts and comedy hits revealed in the television spots.  Amidst the predictability, Yesterday starts to lose some of its balance in terms of several decisions they made with the characters.  One thing is Kate McKinnon, the comedic queen holds the same personality quirks that people loved, but for me her style of comedy was forced and a little too extreme for the tone this movie set.  It’s SNL like presentation worked sometimes, but like a few Sheeran moments felt out of place from the components I liked.  And much like many films, Yesterday’s secondary characters we are introduced to sort of feel lost to the layered storytelling, dropped in the background for more comedic one liners.  Sure a bit realistic, but again I’m about utilizing the characters as much as you can.  Oh well, I guess that decisions goes with the themes of the movie about fame vs everything else, which although artistically presented sometimes got a bit too after school special for me.  However, the biggest “let down” so to speak was the lack of mind-blowing, or even suspenseful, revelations that the trailers suggest lied in the wings of this mystery.  Yesterday’s concept is interesting, so you were hoping for some secret to be revealed that would not sweep the film off of the beautiful presentation he put together. Not the case, for the concept sort of fizzles out in favor of pursuing the character arc stories that were built in the 2 hours.

 

      Overall, Yesterday worked for me and was fun to watch.  A beautiful balance of love, music, and charming artistic quality, Boyle proves to still have the eye for alternative storytelling.  It’s an entertaining film with a lot of heart that many should enjoy and I feel the acting performances and direction give you the characters you want to invest your time in.  There are some forced moments into the movie, primarily in altering the comedy to add a little more moisture to the drier comedy, but it’s really the lack of that giant revelation punch at the mystery that really stood out for me in terms of areas to improve.  Still, the charming tale is one that can be enjoyed in theater, but the fact it doesn’t have enough flash bang boom components means that a home viewing is most likely in your future. 

 

My scores are:

 

Comedy/Fantasy/Music:  8.0

Movie Overall: 7.0

 

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The King Is Moving To Improved Aspect, But Still Not Finding Balance

Godzilla: King of the Monsters Poster

 

The start of summer is the start of big movies and this weekend opens up with the “king” of blockbusters in the form of big monsters. Over many years, the giant monster movies have intrigued many and disgusted others, but they exist nonetheless to unleash their own brand of big budget chaos to the world.  Yet with mixed results, can this genre find the right audiences or are we still plagued by the modern era of too much bang and not enough buck?  Robbie K here to share some words on the latest movie to hit the silver screen.

 

Movie: Godzilla: King Of The Monsters (2019)

 

Director:

Michael Dougherty

Writers:

Michael Dougherty (screenplay by), Zach Shields (screenplay by)  | 3 more credits »

Stars:

Kyle ChandlerVera FarmigaMillie Bobby Brown

 

 

LIKES:

  • Character Design
  • Pacing After The first 30 minutes or So
  • The Animation
  • The Action
  • The Climactic Ending sort of
  • The Sound Track/Special Effects

 

DISLIKES:

  • The Pace Of the Movie’s Opening
  • The Story
  • The Focus On Humans…again
  • Action Scenes Were sometimes short lived
  • The Shaky Camera Work
  • The Imbalance Of Monsters… kind of

 

Fans Who Like These May Like This Movie:

Kong Skull island

Godzilla like movies

Pacific Rim Series

 

 

 

 

SUMMARY:

 

Big budget films about monsters require a lot of things to appeal to the mass audiences and much of it has to with special effects and action.  The King Of The Monsters manages to focus much on this, becoming a special effects extravaganza that did not yield to the limitations of speakers and screens.  The animation is on point, and many of the creatures look stellar in their design, throwing away the prosthetics and papier Mache for stellar high definition CGI graphics.  Smooth monster animation that looks to stick to anatomical movements are beautifully unleashed and it helps bring these monsters one step closer to being real.  Eventually the monsters start battling and the action scenes have a number of special effects in both sound effects and visual styles to unleash Armageddon on the big screen.  Those who love seeing chaos unleashed with little else binding them, and getting a little more human involvement as well, should be pleased with the destruction at hand in that fastest way possible.  This is especially true in the final battle, where the behemoths battlegrounds hold much to be destroyed, assisted by theater shaking sound editing, an epic symphony score to add edge, flashy blasts from the atomic driven beasts, and plenty artificially generated beasts to fill your eyes.  It’s climactic and satisfying, and something I was hoping to see since the trailers showed.

With special effects focus though, the movie sort of stumbles on other categories that still need some work for this reviewer. The opening of the film is rather boring, a jumbled mess of convoluted introductions, explanations about what is going on and the human focus that will lead to all the mess.  For a movie about monsters, much of the screen time still focuses on the terrors of humanity, focusing on how much we suck in our attempts to control everything.  Unlike Kong, Godzilla’s second arc still has trouble grounding its size to a deeper plot, that involves interacting with these creatures more than from the safeties of the bunkers.  Even if you don’t care about the story, the action scenes are also in need of some work, even the climactic ending.  For one thing, many of the fights are very short lived, over in mere minutes after buildups of more talking from humans.  The Fight with Rodan might have been my favorite, having the most integration of human and beast combination that brought me into the zone, but other times it was a jumbled mess of quick shots of stuff blowing up before panning back to humans.  Other times, there were shaky bouts of camera work of close up monsters and falling buildings.  This improved at the end, but it took a long time to discover something other films have already mastered.  Finally, the number of monsters represented was not awful, but again trying to put too many in for them doing very little is a component that annoys me.  Mothra and Rodon were kind of there, hitting there moments at the right times, but not maximized.  Other creatures we get to see passing shots of, but they were unnecessary when we could have had more epic monster battles.

As you can see, the King Of Monsters is certainly going to hold the special effect event of the summer, or at least pretty close to it. It’s problem is, that it’s imbalance issues continue to mix the movie up in a messy sorts that some will love and others won’t.  The monster aspect gets points for chaos, destruction, and special effects that these movies thrive on so monster fans should be stoked by these aspects.  The action again is mixed for me, part awesome with the special effects and yet part disappointing because of the fast pace, focus on humans more than monsters, and shaky camera work that could have been expanded upon.  Perhaps the next installment can figure out the chemistry to the monster movie balance and bring back the magic of the dying genre. Still with all the special effects and monsters in this film, despite how imbalanced they are, the movie is worth the visit to the theater. So check it out when you can.

 

My scores are:

 

Action/Adventure/Fantasy: 7.5

Movie Overall: 6.5

There Is Hellboy To Pay

Hellboy Poster

 

Comic book movies remain the big fashion of the era, utilizing big budgets to bring the world of literature to life in ways the fanbase never imagined.  With DC and Marvel combatting for supremacy, the independent studios are still trying to work their way in and get some publicity themselves.  The first two installments of this movie held their own charms, but are a little outdated and thus comes this weekend’s flick in the form of a modern update of the dark, mercenary comic.  Robbie K back with another review as we look at:

 

Movie: Hellboy (2019)

 

Director:

Neil Marshall

Writers:

Andrew Cosby (screenplay by), Mike Mignola (based on the Dark Horse Comic Book “Hellboy” created by)

Stars:

David HarbourMilla JovovichIan McShane

 

 

LIKES:

Most of the Acting

Comedy

Action

Pace

Costumes

Music

 

SUMMARY:

 

Hellboy requires some people ready to go in the darker parts of the superhero world, and the cast did a good job for the most part.  David Harbour brings some new life to the role, bringing the sarcasm of Hellboy with some broader emotion than Perlman did a while back. Ian McShane does his work in the executive director role, playing that tough father figure that is always the guiding light to the demon’s moral compass quite well.  My favorite though was Sasha Lane, who took the complex role of Alice and unleashed it to its full potential of the awkward time in awkward circumstances.  The chemistry between Harbour and the group is astounding, fun and much of the light in this wave of darkness.

Other factors that I enjoyed include comedy that is fun, well delivered lines and some semi-slapstick that left me impressed with the wit that was behind it.  The laughs were used well, balanced in the grand scheme of the story without becoming the central focus, which I applaud.  The action components also use the comedy to make for some more engaging fights, and Hellboy makes the effort to help keep action scenes dynamic and different.  My favorite fight was the end battle, which held more of the adrenaline-fueled insanity that makes me fist pump in excitement. This action leads to a pace that works well in comic book movies, and Hellboy does not drag too long like some of the other super flicks have hit sometimes.  In addition, the musical score manages to support and life to the mix as well, with both orchestral and regular songs to spice things up in their high energy fashion.

Yet, the biggest positive for me is the costumes and settings of the world.  The makeup artists and CGI guys accomplished the goals of bringing 2-D images to life, crafting devilish monsters, nightmare inducing creatures, and savage creations that fit quite well in the hellion universe.  Hellboy’s cast of interesting characters are equipped to look the part, and while not consistent, they for the most part hold the attributes needed to make the world of Hellboy come to life.  The various organizations and fortresses are crafted to represent the world as well, props, uniforms, and various other components that mirror the worlds crafted by the Dark Horse Comics authors and illustrators.

 

DISLIKES:

Mila Jovovich’s character

Overdramatic Flair

The Story

The Lack of Focus

The Loudness

The Aggressive Graphicness

 

Summary:

The acting was fine for the most part and Jovovich does a fine job acting as she always does.  However, this character they crafted was not quite the same denizen of darkness I love in this series.  This blood queen had some scarring moments, but she was not quite the threatening image I wanted to see unleashed in the film.  Her direction was more overdramatic delivery and singular speeches rather than a well-built character for us to either love or hate.  The result was a weaker antagonist to stand against for the nearly 2 hour run time.  It’s that overdramatic flair at other components that takes precipice, which takes away from the overall movie rather than add, the grandiose nature a little annoying at times.

In regards to the story, Hellboy is trying to cram a lot of arcs into a small run time, trying to take the mini-series approach without the mini-series time table.  This rendition holds a lot of introductions into the world of the big armed demon, including father introduction, friend introductions, prophecies, rivalry establishment, and more.  All these factors are rapidly developed, giving little time, obstacles, or suspense that these stories requires, leading to flat storytelling that held such promise. It’s the lack of focus in these things that makes the movie okay, but not truly great.

  Finally, the aggressive visuals and sounds may also be quite overwhelming given the preference of the audience.  In regards to sounds, this movie is very loud, and those with sensitive ears will need to brings some barriers to reduce the impact of the cacophony of sounds that rush in to avoid ears ringing.  Visual wise, again the movie’s CGI group has applied their skills in the way fitting of a dark comic book series like this.  However, they may have done too good of a job as the blood, gore, and sinew dribbles like rain in this movie.  Hellboy’s focus is very much geared towards filling the silver screen with as much maiming as possible, bringing some disturbing imagery to embed itself into your memory.  Sometimes, this worked for me very well, but other times it was unnecessary, merely blatant attempts to raise the shock factor another few notches.  If that’s the kind of visuals you want in this kind of film, then you will want to flock to the theaters and catch it in high definition goodness. 

 

The VERDICT:

            Overall, Hellboy is not a bad movie as many have said, but it didn’t deliver on the potential crafted in the trailers.  Some good visuals, comedy, and fast paced action were good starts in terms of getting the comic vibe up, but the movie itself just doesn’t have all the finesse it needed like the bigger studios have done in the past.  We needed some focus on the story, some bigger suspense added to the mix, and more importantly finding that balance to extend the movie into a series rather than in one movie.  Perhaps a series would be the next step to better presentations, but for now, this movie has a lot of special effects to make a theater visit worthy, but with other super hero films coming or still in theaters, you are best left to waiting or attending these. 

 

My scores are:

Action/Adventure/Fantasy: 6.5

Movie Overall:: 5.5

Lots Of Fun In Little Time

Little Poster

 

Remixes and twists on classics, Hollywood’s bread and butter to drop lots of movies with each weekend that passes. This weekend that trend continues, as Tom Hanks beloved Big gets reversed to a smaller proportion.  With lots of advertising and the hopes that it will do extremely well this weekend, this comedy looks to be cute and fun for a movie adventure.  So what is in store?  Well Robbie K is back again with yet another review and it is time to see if the latest comedy will keep you laughing or leave you scoffing.  Let’s get started as we review;

 

Movie:  Little (2019)

 

Director:

Tina Gordon (as Tina Gordon Chism)

Writers:

Tracy Oliver (story by), Tina Gordon (as Tina Gordon Chism)

Stars:

Regina HallIssa RaeMarsai Martin

 

 

LIKES:

 

Fun

Cute

Acting

Soundtrack

Morals

 

SUMMARY: The name of the game is fun in this installment.  Little finds a way to relive the magic of Big and help gain a second childhood in the modern-day world.  My friend and I had a blast with the little adventure at hand as both characters tackle the new challenges put before them in the worlds they are forced to face.  The jokes were on point and well timed, keeping in theme with the energy of the movie. Part of this comes from the cute atmosphere established with the writing of this movie, mature enough to hit the older audience, yet still young enough to hit the teenagers and young adult crowd.

 

The acting helps to make this movie pop, Issa Rae works the assistant scene quite well, sass and innocence building together quite well to make a likeable character.  She helps balance out the silliness, yet still add to it in her own manner that breaks up some of the monotony this film chooses to approach.  As for young actress Marsai Martin, she’s got quite a start to the acting career and I look forward to seeing the young girl in future installments.  She’s got the attitude of an adult down pat, sass blending with some comedic relief and childish moments that are quite balanced for a movie like this.  Nevertheless, the chemistry between all cast both primary and secondary groups work well and I quite enjoyed seeing the teamwork bring the characters to life.

 

Yet, part of the fun comes from a killer soundtrack, new and old tracks coming together to capture the feelings of the scenes.  The cultural representation the sound editor picked was extremely awesome, and had me dancing in my seat while also wanting to break out my phone to look up the songs. Even smarter, is that much of the movie’s song sort of emphasize the other part I like of this movie, the morals that are embedded in this film.  Yes, like many movies the morals are preachy and baked right in, but Little finds a way to mesh those lessons into some fun moments that help you enjoy what you are learning. Finding some lessons that are relevant, Little gets props for helping the audience dig deep and look into themselves to find their own abilities.

 

Dislikes:

 

Predictable

Fast

Missed opportunities

Some pointless character introductions

Story points that are limited

Trailers give away much

 

SUMMARY:  Predictable thy name is comedy and Little tries hard to defy the expected jokes and plot lines this movie sets up a mile away. Little’s focus on having fun means using the same tricks to get a laugh and the same means to get to the end of the story.  Rather than leading to a build up, with areas that require intense focus, discovery, and a major push to get better, Little takes the fast approach to getting through the film.  It’s okay, but the movie had a lot of hinted opportunities that showed promise, but then dropped the ball leading to some disappointing moments.  This was especially true with the teacher scenes that the trailers loved to highlight, characters that held potential with their introduction, but reduced to comedic props that didn’t quite pack the kick I think they wanted. Some of the story points as well had the same issues going the same way, hints of fun adventures and the growth of characters that quickly fizzled out.  Finally, the trailers are good at revealing much of the movie and there isn’t too much one needs to see past the highlights they showed.  Little falls victim to showing off too much, leaving little to the imagination outside of some of more engaging dialogue and a few romance scenes.

 

The VERDICT:

 

Little is fun, simple as that, but the movie needs some refining to be the classic that Big was presenting long ago.  This new spin is cute, hits the target audience members well, and does the job of teaching you the important lessons with baked in, heartwarming goodness.  While the movie is funny to so many levels, it is still very predictable and had so many avenues to go down for comedy that they left unfulfilled.  Thus, the potential for going to see in the theaters is lessened by the trailers and lack of finesse that they were going for, and I recommend waiting on this one for home viewing.  Still, check this one out eventually if you are looking for the means to have a good laugh fest for simplistic fun.

 

My scores are:

 

Comedy/Fantasy/Romance: 6.5

Movie Overall: 5.0

A Kid’s Quest For Family, Friendly Fun

The Kid Who Would Be King Poster

 

Kid’s movies are a mixed bag of tricks depending on the studio behind it.  Without major studios, the films often take a stray to gimmicks that parents roll their eyes at, while kids squeal in delight.  Today, another studio tries to hit the box office big time before the big budget films take reign.  As such, I’m here to give thought once more on the latest film to hit the silver screen. Robbie K here reviewing;

 

Movie: The Kid Who Would Be King (2019)

 

Director:

Joe Cornish

Writer:

Joe Cornish

Stars:

Louis Ashbourne SerkisDenise GoughDean Chaumoo

 

 

LIKES:

 

Acting

Merlin

Funny

Blending

Action

Balance

 

SUMMARY: Kids movies with a young cast sometimes lose balance, but this cast does a nice job reigning in the antics, but capturing the magic of being a kid.  The young band of modern nights have a direction of portraying bullying, helping to bring relevant issues to light and bringing the suffering to realistic levels.  And while these characters are rather well curtailed, it is the young Merlin accompanying them that impressed me the most.  This new take on Merlin brings comedy, nobility, teaching, and a new flair to the legendary figure that works well for the feel of this movie.  Utilizing the magic of Patrick Stewartfor the adult figurehead, the merlin role’s direction was quite fun to watch in his integration.

Yet, the true success of this film comes from the blending of the attributes that the trailers portrayed for so many commercials. The Kid Who Would Be King is funny a blend of kid humor with some wit that makes it fun for both young and old. Blending the modern and the archaic worlds together is an interesting spin that really worked for me.  Seeing the various medieval references transitioned to modern Britain was an entertaining craftmanship that should again appeal to many. The adventure crafted ran at a good pace and managed to make an age appropriate tale.  For the action scenes, this king’s adventure surprisingly does this well, finding again the balance to make exciting sequences against the CGI figures, but not crossing into super violent or dark skirmishes that can lead to parents complaining of inappropriate scenes.  If you’ve read this you know this, the movie has surprising balance to it, making a rather good go for a non-Disney film.

 

DISLIKES:

 

Predictable

Morgana’s under utilization

A few antics overdone

The Suspense of Reality

 

 

SUMMARY:

 

The movie may have creativity, balance, and decent acting, but it still struggles with surprises. This quest for Camelot has a predictable tale, foreshadowing the surprises far down the road and bringing with it lackluster twists they tried so hard to do.  While kids will be wowed and potentially fooled, older adults don’t have much to be shocked by, and can instead be gauging if the scene will scare their little ones.

Even sadder is the main villain’s semi-integration to the film.  While she had her say in things, I felt more could have been done to bring the witch to full glory and malice.  It could have been better inclusion into the battles, or more watching and development during her exile, but Morgana’s a villain could have used some more magic to become the central antagonist, as opposed to who took that center stage.

Instead the kid friendly elements of funny antics took center stage for much of the movie.  While I agree there is balance, this quest still succumbs to some antics being used too much for the older audiences.  The fun hand antics and running jokes are cute and well timed, but it’s a little overdone and susceptible to being the next focus of the meme revolution. Small dislike as it is, this slight limitation added some unnecessary length and turned away from some of the storytelling elements they were starting to pick up on.

Yet the biggest thing that was distracting for an older reviewer like me was the suspense of reality.  In fantasy, I get that rules don’t always apply, but this journey established realistic physics into the mix and started breaking its own rules. It’s mainly in the final moments of the movie, but this particular physics defying roles get a little cheesy for the older audience, though it can all be written off by use of magic allowing this to happen and kids won’t care.  Yet, while this is picky, it’s this component that sort of takes away from the suspense of the fight for me, but again I’m not the key audience.

 

 

THE VERDICT:

 

The Kid Who Would Be King is truly a fun film, that holds magic and wonder for those interested in the modernization of King Arthur’s tale.  The quest contains fun, action, and heart that can touch a lot of members in the audience in surprising ways.  Yet, it’s not the most original tale, doesn’t follow its own rules, can’t shake the predictability, and doesn’t quite have the full magic that Merlin wanted to conjure up.  Still, the film succeeded in being fun, is age appropriate across most fields, and contains enough movie magic to warrant a trip to the theater.

 

My scores are:

 

Adventure/Family/Fantasy: 7.5-8.0

Movie Overall:  6.5

Returning In A Style For Both Old and New. Mary Poppins For The Family Feature Win

Mary Poppins Returns Poster

 

Years ago, the nanny that changed everything charmed her way into the theaters, bringing song and dance to her teachings as he helped sculpt family lives.  It was a wonderful movie that shed so much joy and wonder to the families who gave it a try. Decades later, the mystical nanny has decided to return once more, in hopes of bringing the same magic to the mix. Will her resurgence bring the same joy and whimsy, or has her relevance blown over too many generations to warrant the same quality?  Welcome to Robbie’s movie reviews as I take on:

 

Movie: Marry Poppins Returns (2018)

 

 

Director:

Rob Marshall

Writers:

David Magee (screenplay by), David Magee (screen story by)

Stars:

Emily BluntLin-Manuel MirandaBen Whishaw

 

 

LIKES:

 

Acting: While no one can replace the lovely Julie Andrews, it does not mean that Blunt has not done wonders with the character.  Still holding the same nostalgic quality, the new Mary Poppins has a little more edge, sass, and a wonderful balance of love that is quite endearing to see with her cast mates.  Lin-Manuel as well adds his own fun to the crew, bringing his theatrical qualities to the character of Bert. Nostalgic enough to have that same childish demeanor, but different to stand out, his musical skills were quite welcome to the mix. And as for the rest of the crew, they all do a bang-up job of adding to the film, and the young cast of the Banks kids are well directed to avoid being the annoying twerps these roles can be.

 

The Numbers:  Mary Poppins was all about bringing the energetic numbers that would forever ingrain themselves in the music hall of fame.  With her return, Mary once more brought the energy back to the screen, utilizing Miranda’s talents well to once more bring the showmanship of the theater.  This film is filled with the magical song and dance routines made famous in the first film and will have the young and young at heart dancing in their seats.  Each of these numbers accomplished the goal of being resident, and in true musical fashion was able to portray their inner feelings and lessons.  A wonderful ensemble of songs awaits the audience members, and holds great potential to become that new song to be repeated a thousand times.

 

The Story:  Thank the idea of nostalgia, or thank the director because the return of Mary Poppins brings with it a charming delight that holds both old and new motifs in its well-timed shots.  Lessons for all generations lie the nanny’s wisdom, utilizing a variety of worlds and settings to help the Banks family find their way in the harsh London streets  Much of the story contains nods to the original plot, while others hold something new and exciting in their powerful sequences. In addition, there is enough nod to other characters to establish the fate of the various characters, while also being original to stand on its own.  Regardless, there is so much delight and balance to the story to help rope many into the plot.

 

The Classic Animation:  Think back to the classic version and one might recall the dive into the 2-D cartoon land and the epic scenes and songs that came with it.  Over 50 years later, and Disney was not afraid to return to the cartoon theatrics again.  I thoroughly enjoyed the return to Disney’s origins, seeing the classic art style fill the screen and integrate with our live action friends.  Again, the memories of youth rush back in with it and bring perhaps my favorite number that held so much pep and vibrant enthusiasm.  A wonderful nod to the old, while making sure to balance the new style into the mix as well.

 

 

DISLIKES:

 

More Of the Older Banks Children:  The trailers painted heavy integration of Michael and Jane as they fall under the care of the nanny to relearn things left behind.  While they have a decently strong integration into the mix, it’s not quite the same level I was expecting and as such wanted them to go on the journey a little more with their kids.  Again, nothing remotely weak, but perhaps a little more integration could have taken the element farther.

 

 

More Time In the Animation: The classic horse racing scene had plenty of time in the 2-D world, making sure to really give the audience the full fun of the scene.  This movie did a fantastic job in the short time they were there, but I was hoping for more time or at least another visit to an animated world where the two styles could meet.  Poppins may do a great job balancing a lot of components, but yours truly wanted another masterpiece in 2-D/live integration that could bring with it the same memory etching greatness it did.

 

The Meryl Streep Number: Is it cute?  Yes!  Does it serve a musical number with catchy lyrics and beats?  Yes.  Does Meryl Streep do a good job?  Yes. So why a dislike?  Well, this number as fun as it is, is very irrelevant to the story.  The dive into the workshop held some potential, but stuck out like the sore thumb at its inclusion into the whole plot, dropping it after the nearly 10 minutes of inclusion.  I just wished that they had continued the story, and perhaps brought another number in, again relevant tot eh story.

 

The VERDICT:

 

            Overall, the second visit to Mary Poppins’ lessons still has plenty of charm, love, and energy that will bring so much joy to the audience.  Get ready to have your family film of the holidays, ready to bridge generation gaps, and help one learn old lessons in the new age.  With relevant, energetic song and dance numbers, a fantastic cast with great chemistry, and whimsy from a number of sources, this reviewer encourages hitting the the theater for this one. And while it is not the same as the first movie, it holds its own charm and wonder that was long overdue for the cinema. 

 

My scores are:

 

Comedy/Family/Fantasy: 8.0-8.5

Movie Overall: 7.0-7.5

Aquamantastic! Swimming In The Right Direction

Aquaman Poster