A Kid’s Quest For Family, Friendly Fun

The Kid Who Would Be King Poster

 

Kid’s movies are a mixed bag of tricks depending on the studio behind it.  Without major studios, the films often take a stray to gimmicks that parents roll their eyes at, while kids squeal in delight.  Today, another studio tries to hit the box office big time before the big budget films take reign.  As such, I’m here to give thought once more on the latest film to hit the silver screen. Robbie K here reviewing;

 

Movie: The Kid Who Would Be King (2019)

 

Director:

Joe Cornish

Writer:

Joe Cornish

Stars:

Louis Ashbourne SerkisDenise GoughDean Chaumoo

 

 

LIKES:

 

Acting

Merlin

Funny

Blending

Action

Balance

 

SUMMARY: Kids movies with a young cast sometimes lose balance, but this cast does a nice job reigning in the antics, but capturing the magic of being a kid.  The young band of modern nights have a direction of portraying bullying, helping to bring relevant issues to light and bringing the suffering to realistic levels.  And while these characters are rather well curtailed, it is the young Merlin accompanying them that impressed me the most.  This new take on Merlin brings comedy, nobility, teaching, and a new flair to the legendary figure that works well for the feel of this movie.  Utilizing the magic of Patrick Stewartfor the adult figurehead, the merlin role’s direction was quite fun to watch in his integration.

Yet, the true success of this film comes from the blending of the attributes that the trailers portrayed for so many commercials. The Kid Who Would Be King is funny a blend of kid humor with some wit that makes it fun for both young and old. Blending the modern and the archaic worlds together is an interesting spin that really worked for me.  Seeing the various medieval references transitioned to modern Britain was an entertaining craftmanship that should again appeal to many. The adventure crafted ran at a good pace and managed to make an age appropriate tale.  For the action scenes, this king’s adventure surprisingly does this well, finding again the balance to make exciting sequences against the CGI figures, but not crossing into super violent or dark skirmishes that can lead to parents complaining of inappropriate scenes.  If you’ve read this you know this, the movie has surprising balance to it, making a rather good go for a non-Disney film.

 

DISLIKES:

 

Predictable

Morgana’s under utilization

A few antics overdone

The Suspense of Reality

 

 

SUMMARY:

 

The movie may have creativity, balance, and decent acting, but it still struggles with surprises. This quest for Camelot has a predictable tale, foreshadowing the surprises far down the road and bringing with it lackluster twists they tried so hard to do.  While kids will be wowed and potentially fooled, older adults don’t have much to be shocked by, and can instead be gauging if the scene will scare their little ones.

Even sadder is the main villain’s semi-integration to the film.  While she had her say in things, I felt more could have been done to bring the witch to full glory and malice.  It could have been better inclusion into the battles, or more watching and development during her exile, but Morgana’s a villain could have used some more magic to become the central antagonist, as opposed to who took that center stage.

Instead the kid friendly elements of funny antics took center stage for much of the movie.  While I agree there is balance, this quest still succumbs to some antics being used too much for the older audiences.  The fun hand antics and running jokes are cute and well timed, but it’s a little overdone and susceptible to being the next focus of the meme revolution. Small dislike as it is, this slight limitation added some unnecessary length and turned away from some of the storytelling elements they were starting to pick up on.

Yet the biggest thing that was distracting for an older reviewer like me was the suspense of reality.  In fantasy, I get that rules don’t always apply, but this journey established realistic physics into the mix and started breaking its own rules. It’s mainly in the final moments of the movie, but this particular physics defying roles get a little cheesy for the older audience, though it can all be written off by use of magic allowing this to happen and kids won’t care.  Yet, while this is picky, it’s this component that sort of takes away from the suspense of the fight for me, but again I’m not the key audience.

 

 

THE VERDICT:

 

The Kid Who Would Be King is truly a fun film, that holds magic and wonder for those interested in the modernization of King Arthur’s tale.  The quest contains fun, action, and heart that can touch a lot of members in the audience in surprising ways.  Yet, it’s not the most original tale, doesn’t follow its own rules, can’t shake the predictability, and doesn’t quite have the full magic that Merlin wanted to conjure up.  Still, the film succeeded in being fun, is age appropriate across most fields, and contains enough movie magic to warrant a trip to the theater.

 

My scores are:

 

Adventure/Family/Fantasy: 7.5-8.0

Movie Overall:  6.5

Advertisements